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The Stomach – Diagnosis

The Stomach-Diagnosis Your Food Includes All of Life’s Experiences by Bill Tims Recently I was in the intensive care ward of Massachusetts General Hospital to visit a close friend of mine who was fighting for his life with acute duodenal ulceration, kidney failure, severe edema, and a rapidly weakening heart condition. As I entered the quiet, sterile, yet busy room, I was instantly consumed by a heavy cloud of death. As I approached what was to be my friend’s deathbed, I saw him lying there, unconscious, swollen beyond recognition, and punctured like a pin cushion with intravenous needles for injecting both food and medications. A sudden mixture of emotions simultaneously arose in me. It was fear of death; a strange combination of gratitude toward the doctor and nurses caring...

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The Stomach

The Stomach You Needn't Be Diamond Jim Brady to Have a Champion Stomachs will hold just about anything we put in. To most people, the stomach is the fool of the body-after all, its only dream in life is to fill itself with food, and it has to be a dummy to tolerate the abuse we give it at times. The stomach has few talents compared to other organs, but what it does-taking in and processing large amounts of food-it does extremely well. An elephant’s stomach calmly takes in up to 750 pounds of grass and green leaves every day, while large snakes swallow whole pigs and antelopes, and alligator stomachs think nothing of digesting turtles, shell and all. Not to be outdone by our lower relatives, human beings...

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The Pancreas

The Pancreas This Gland’s Balancing Act Keeps Us Centered While probably one out of ten suffer from diabetes, a 1977 HEW study revealed that every other person in the U.S. suffers from hypoglycemia, diabetes’ mysterious sister disorder. True, as our third leading cause of death, diabetes in all its ramifications annually kills 350,000 Americans (just over half the death rate of cancer), and the number of reported ‘hypoglycemia deaths’ is minute by comparison. But once one realizes that hypoglycemia has been identified as a possible cause for at least a major proportion of alcoholism, drug abuse, violent crime, suicide, psychiatric disorders, and many other common ills that result in death or disablement, one begins to get the uneasy feeling that hypoglycemia itself may be the heavyweight, and...

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The Lungs – Diagnosis

The Lungs-Diagnosis  Keeping Tabs on the Seat of Our Feeling  by Bill Tims In diagnosing the condition of the lungs, we can look first at the face in the area of the cheeks on a line with the mouth. A sallow, pale or slightly puffy appearance of the cheeks usually suggests weakness and under activity in the lung function and is generally accompanied by poor circulation, difficult breathing (particularly in a prone position), weak chest muscles leading to rounding and tensing of the shoulders, a drooped posture, and often a tendency toward anemia and obesity. If this condition becomes chronic it can often lead to pleurisy, emphysema, asthma, and the progressive development toward lung or breast cancer. This condition is most commonly associated with the excessive consumption of...

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The Lungs

The Lungs Stoking the Inner Fires As you read this article, you will probably breathe ten to fourteen times each minute. With each breath you will take in about a half-quart of air or five to seven quarts per minute, and if you needed to, you could take in much more. For instance, if a dinosaur suddenly broke into your room and chased you around, you might find yourself breathing 200 quarts of air per minute, which is more than 25 times what you are breathing now. But with no beast in sight we can take a few minutes to learn about these lungs of ours which expand and contract 20,000 times a day, our personal bellows that keep our inner fire going. The lungs are the only...

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The Liver – Diagnosis

The Liver-Diagnosis  Your Eyes Monitor the Health of Your Largest Organ Recently a woman in her mid thirties came to me for a consultation. Her primary complaint was a persistent sty in her right eye. Upon questioning and examination, I found that the sty had first arisen in the spring, that she had lots of yellow mucus forming in her eyes, and that the area between her eyes was swollen and puffy. She also felt her life was floating without any stability, she had a hard time getting out of bed in the morning, and her impatience about seeing me, about curing herself, and even about getting out of my office was extreme. For twelve years she had been a lacto-vegetarian, consuming regular quantities of dairy products,...

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The Liver

The Liver-Body  The Beneficent Godfather Is a Second Brain The image of a godfather has become familiar to all of us. He is that hidden persuader who takes care of people, a real but unofficial leader who oversees the community’s affairs. Outsiders don’t even know he exists, but throughout the community his presence is felt everywhere. The liver is like a beneficent godfather to the body. Hidden silently beneath our ribs, this huge, deep-red, wedge-shaped mountain oversees the activities and welfare of the body. Weighing about three pounds, the liver is massive and solid. It extends vertically from our right nipple almost down to the bottom of our rib cage. Crossways, it goes from the right side over to the left nipple. About the same size as the brain,...

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The Kidneys

The Kidneys-Body and Diagnosis  These Delicate Organs Are Vital to Our Overall Drive It's wintertime again, and like other macrobiotic counselors I expect many people will be coming to see me with kidney and urinary problems as they have for the past five years. Recently, I read that some 67 percent of all heart attacks in the U.S. occur during the summer months and that some 47 percent of all gallbladder attacks take place during April and May. These statistics may sound a bit strange to anyone unfamiliar with the traditional diagnostic techniques of Oriental medicine; however, its practitioners commonly use the season or time of day in which a particular symptom or illness recurs to help them determine which of the internal organs is troubled. Unlike modern...

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The Small Intestines – Diagnosis

The Intestines-Diagnosis  Our Mouth Speaks Eloquently of the Small Intestine Most of us don't spend much time thinking about our small intestine-you might say it’s another one of our body’s unsung heroes. Yet, heroic it is, for our overall health and mental clarity depend upon the proper functioning of this amazing yet often unappreciated organ. According to modern medicine, the function of the small intestine is to absorb nutrients and eliminate waste from the body. However, according to the late Japanese scientist Dr. Morashu Chishima, the small intestine is also the primary site for the production of blood. After years of experiments, Chishima concluded that the small intestine, through some as yet unknown chemical process, produces white blood cells directly from the absorbed food particles, out of which...

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The Large Intestines – Diagnosis

The Intestines-Diagnosis  How to Know When Your Large Intestine Is Overworked The traditional art of physiognomy can be used to understand the constitution and condition of the large intestine. The two major functions of the large intestine are to absorb water, vitamins, and minerals through its mucus-lined tissue to be transported to the liver for distribution and use by the body; and the excretion of excessive nutrients and wastes such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and phosphates. When the large intestine becomes overworked, or there is a lack of physical exercise in one’s life, various symptoms begin to arise which have reached an almost epidemic proportion in our modern-day society. These include diarrhea, constipation, flatulence, colitis, hemorrhoids, hernias, abdominal swelling and cramping, cancer of the colon, and obesity. These...

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